Posted by Marie Presti on 11/22/2020

Photo by PublicDomainPictures via Pixabay


 

Hanging baskets add personal enjoyment as well as curb appeal to any home. If you're the creative type, you may prefer to make your own rather than purchase ready-made hanging baskets from home and garden retailers. However, DIY hanging baskets sometimes fail to thrive. The following tips and tricks help ensure that your baskets look and perform their best from spring through fall. 

Choose Plants According to Sun/Shade Requirements

Sun-loving plants such as petunias languish and eventually fail to even bloom if placed in areas that don't meet their sun requirements, while shade-lovers such as impatiens and fuchsia may literally burn up if they're exposed to hours of hot sun on a regular basis. 

If the sun requirements aren't listed on the tag that comes with the plant, check online or in your favorite encyclopedia-style gardening book and make sure that you select appropriate locations for your baskets. Also, keep in mind that varieties that thrive in shaded locations often do quite well in morning sun

Choose Plants That Bloom All Season

Most annual plants bloom from spring or early summer until frost,  so stick with them rather than using perennials for your hanging baskets. You'll have to replace them every spring, but that helps keep things interesting and fun. 

Pick Off Spent Blooms 

When flowers go to seed, that sends a signal to the plant that it's time to start slowing down on the blooming process and focus its energy on seed production. Picking off spent blooms, or deadheading, helps fools the plant into continuing to produce flowers. Some annual varieties, such as Wave petunias, have been bred to keep producing even after individual blossoms go to seed, so these make good choices for busy homeowners who may not have time to pay meticulous attention to their hanging baskets. 

Use Potting Soil Designed to Retain Water

Plants growing in hanging baskets require more watering than their counterparts growing in cultivated flower beds because their roots can't reach down deep to access water sources. Using a potting soil designed to retain water helps hedge their bets against drying out before you can get a chance to water them. 

Use Potting Soil With a Slow-Release Fertilizer

Fertilizing hanging baskets with traditional products is tricky — if you apply too much, you run the risk of damaging or even killing the plants, and if you use too little, the fertilizer won't provide the desired benefits. Using potting soil that's infused with a slow-release fertilizer circumvents both of these problems.  

Making your own hanging baskets not only saves you a bit of money at the home and garden center, it also helps you avoid the mass-produced look of the majority of ready-made hanging baskets.




Tags: flowers   curb appeal   home decor  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Marie Presti on 6/26/2016

Curb appeal may very well be one of the most important aspects of a home to spruce up when selling. Why is this, you ask? First impressions. Whether it be an open house or an individual showing, the outside of a house is the first thing a homebuyer physically sees. And itís their first impression of your home. First impressions set the pace of a showing. If the landscaping is lacking or nonexistent and the homebuyer is not excited to be viewing your home then it could leave them with a less than favorable impression, all before they step foot inside. If the house is exuding with appeal the homebuyer will be excited and eager to see more. This is not to say that the homebuyer will purchase solely because of the curb appeal. The rest of the home should reflect what made that potential homeowner as excited as when they first pulled up and laid eyes on the house and accompanying land. Here are a few tips to maximize curb appeal: Paint: A fresh paint job lays the foundation of curb appeal. Painting or siding an entire home can be expensive, but painting the front door, porch and stairs can be fairly inexpensive and take only a day or two. Try adding a pop of color to the front door to really make your home stand out from the rest. Mulch: Is there anything better than freshly laid mulch? The smell alone can set the tone at a showing, but itís the color that brings it home. Try choosing dark colored mulch with a light colored home to really make it stand out. Flowers & Bushes: Who doesnít like flowers? You really canít go wrong with any type of flower; they are all beautiful. However, itís best to choose low maintenance flowers and bushes just incase the next homeowner isnít looking for extensive yard work. The added color from the flowers and bushes only enhances the amazing curb appeal you will have when youíre done. Lawn & Yard: Maintaining a healthy lawn and clean yard is essential. Burnt or patches of missing grass make the yard look unkempt and not cared for. To ensure bright, green grass invest in a spring clean up of the yard (many landscaping companies offer this service), which includes raking, fertilizing, mowing, etc. Seeding may also be necessary in areas of missing grass. Continue to water and mow throughout the spring, summer and fall for maximum beauty. Lastly, messy yards that include items that pile up over time such as toys, wood, etc. should be tidied up. Curb appeal is not only important when selling a home but also maintaining the value of a home. A house is an investment so make sure to take care of it. Creating and maintaining curb appeal is just one way of caring for your home. Now get to it and good luck!





Posted by Marie Presti on 9/21/2014

The weather is getting cooler but that means it is time to start thinking about spring. Bulbs planted this fall, will bloom starting in early spring. †Some of the most popular bulbs that flower in the spring include tulips and daffodils. Planting bulbs is easy and perfect for the beginner gardener. Here are some tips to get you started: 1. Plant in the fall or early winter before the ground freezes and when evening temperatures average between 40į to 50į F. 2. Prepare the planting bed by digging the soil so it's loose and workable. †You may want to add organic matter such as compost or peat moss to the bed. 3. Plant the pointy end of the bulb up. 4. Plant big bulbs about 8" deep and small bulbs about 5" deep. 5. Plant bulbs in clusters. A lone tulip or daffodil†can look funny. 6. If you are planting bulbs that bloom at the same time, plant low bulbs in front of high. So before the temperature falls too low, get out there and enjoy your garden. In about six months your garden will put on a spectacular spring show.







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